SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME

SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME

Supplemental Security Income is paid to disabled people and to people over the age of 65 who have not earned enough work credits to be insured under SSDI. These individuals must have very low income and fewer than $2,000 in assets ($3,000 for couples).  SSI is a needs-based disability program that provides benefits specifically to low-income individuals with limited access to resources. SSI recipients are commonly adults whose disabilities have prevented them from ever entering the workforce. People who aren’t disabled but are 65 or older and meet certain financial criteria may also obtain SSI benefits. SSI provides a monthly payment to help recipients meet basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter.

SUPPLEMENTAL SECURITY INCOME

The Social Security Administration (SSA) has several requirements that applicants must meet in order to be approved for SSI benefits. You may be eligible if:

  • You are 65 or older.
  • You are under 65 but suffer from a qualifying disability that prevents you from working.
  • You are blind, under the SSA’s standards.

In addition to the medical criteria, you must also fall under the SSA’s income limitations in order to be approved for SSI benefits.

This is a strict requirement, because SSI is intended to help low-income individuals account for everyday essentials. In order to ensure that these benefits are only going to people who truly need them, the SSA sets an income limit every year.

The following counts towards the income limit:

If your combined income from any of these sources exceeds the set limit, you will likely not be eligible for SSI benefits. However, there are some exceptions. Our Los Angeles Supplemental Security Income lawyers can review your claim and help you understand what income counts and doesn’t count toward the limit.

The SSA also places limits on your resources. In order to receive SSI payments, your combined resources must not exceed a set amount dictated by the SSA each year. These resources include:

  • Cash
  • Checking and savings accounts
  • Property other than the home you live in
  • Vehicles other than the one you drive

Similar to your income, there are certain resources that are exempt from the resource limit. In other words, you may still qualify for benefits even if the worth of your resources is higher than the set limit. Our legal team can determine whether any of your resources should not be counted towards the limit to help you receive the full amount of benefits you deserve.